Free State of Prussia

Free State of Prussia
Freistaat Preußen
State of Germany

1918–1947
Flag Coat of arms
Flag (1918–1933) Coat of arms
Motto
Gott mit uns
"God with us"
Location of Prussia
The Free State of Prussia in 1925
Capital Berlin
Government Republic
Reichsstatthalter
 •  1933–1935 Adolf Hitler
 •  1935–1945 Hermann Göring
Minister-President
 •  1918 Friedrich Ebert (first)
 •  1933–1945 Hermann Göring (last)
Legislature State Diet
 •  Upper Chamber State Council
 •  Lower Chamber House of Representatives
Historical era Interwar/World War II
 •  German Revolution 9 November 1918
 •  Constitution adopted 30 November 1920
 •  Preußenschlag 20 July 1932
 •  Machtergreifung 30 January 1933
 •  Reichsstatthaltergesetz 30 January 1935
 •  Formally abolished 25 February 1947
Area
 •  1925[1] 292,695.36 km2 (113,010 sq mi)
Population
 •  1925[1] 38,175,986 
Density 130.4 /km2  (337.8 /sq mi)
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Arms of Brandenburg.svg
Arms of East Prussia.svg

History of Brandenburg and Prussia
Northern March
pre–12th century
Old Prussians
pre–13th century
Margraviate of Brandenburg
1157–1618 (1806)
Teutonic Order
1224–1525
Duchy of Prussia
1525–1618
Royal (Polish) Prussia
1466–1772
Brandenburg-Prussia
1618–1701
Kingdom in Prussia
1701–1772
Kingdom of Prussia
1772–1918
Free State of Prussia
1918–1947
Klaipėda Region
(Lithuania)
1920–1939 / 1945–present
Brandenburg
(Germany)
1947–1952 / 1990–present
Recovered Territories
(Poland)
1918/1945–present
Kaliningrad Oblast
(Russia)
1945–present


The Free State of Prussia (German: Freistaat Preußen) was a German state formed after the abolition of the Kingdom of Prussia in the aftermath of the First World War. It was the major state of the German Reich during the time of the Weimar Republic, comprising almost ​58 (62.5%) of its territory and population.[1] Free state is another German term for republic that was coined in contrast to the Latin word, which was associated with the enemy France in the minds of many Germans of that time.

The democratic Free State of Prussia was rendered incapacitated when it was taken over by the Preußenschlag (Prussian coup) of 1932–33 and Otto Braun was forced from office. His government went to court over this ouster, but in 1933 the Nazi regime seized control of the Prussian government.

From 1933, the Free State was deprived of representative democracy and ruled exclusively under the leadership of the National Socialist German Workers Party (Nazi Party). Initially, Prussia was administered by high-ranking Nazi Hermann Göring who was appointed Minister-President of Prussia. In 1935, the Free State's territory was dismantled into regional Gaue, some of which incorporated both Prussian and non-Prussian territory, thus effectively ending Prussia as a single territorial unit of Germany. Although the Free State of Prussia continued to exist in name under the premiership of Herman Göring throughout the Nazi era, by 1935 the Prussian government had been effectively absorbed by the government of the German Reich and Göring's position as Minister-President had been relegated to a titular role in comparison to his more prominent duties in the government of the Third Reich.

After the end of World War II Otto Braun approached Allied officials to reinstate the legal Prussian government. They and the other Allied Occupation forces, who had occupied all of Germany, were opposed to the idea and declared Prussia abolished in 1947.

  1. ^ a b Beckmanns Welt-Lexikon und Welt-Atlas. Leipzig / Vienna: Verlagsanstalt Otto Beckmann. 1931. 

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